Silencing Employees? Is that Good for Patient Safety at the VHA?

From Beyond Chron

New Threats to Patient Safety at the VHA

by Suzanne Gordon on March 9, 2017

VA Hospital in Washington DC

VA Hospital in Washington DC

Ever since a physician at the Phoenix VA Health Care System reported that Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrators had been gaming data on wait times for patient appointments, VA whistleblowers have been embraced on Capitol Hill. There may be disagreement in Washington about the future of the VHA, but there is bi-partisan agreement that VHA employees should be supported and rewarded when they act to protect their patients.

Unfortunately, not enough legislators and veterans advocates understand that acting to create real patient safety involves far more than being a traditional whistleblower, which, as Webster’s dictionary explains, is “one who reveals something covert or who informs against another.” Or as the Federal Whistleblower Protection Act defines it, involves reporting a “violation of a law, rule or regulation; gross mismanagement; gross waste of funds; an abuse of authority; or a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety.” 

As an extensive literature on patient safety documents, patient safety depends not primarily on the acts of heroic whistleblowers, but on the creation of a workplace environment where you don’t have to be a hero to voice concerns or criticisms, share insights, and make suggestions for change on a daily basis. READ MORE

Protect Veterans Against Trump, CSPAN interview


cspanheight-125-no_border-width-220Just did this CSPAN interview for Veterans Day, please watch and comment.

Some highlights.  VHA care is better than private sector.  Veterans who seek care in the VHA have fewer suicides, better mental health care, better outpatient care.

Privatization is not the way to go.

Jeff Miller Doesn’t Believe Veterans Deserve the Healing Arts

Another blog post on how low people will stoop to deny veterans excellent care.

In Defense of Art in VA Hospitals

Conservatives are mad about spending government money on art, but it provides real medical benefits.

The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has taken a lot of heat lately about using money to purchase art for its hospitals and other facilities. Last week, Gail Collins, in a column in the New York Times, joined in the pile-on. While Collins defended the VHA and opposed its privatization, writing that veterans “are satisfied” with its services and that “the care is in many cases excellent,” she couldn’t resist a jab at the VHA for spending $670,000 on two sculptures that were placed in a blind rehabilitation center. Her conclusion? “Veterans healthcare for everybody! But maybe with less art.”

The issue of spending on art first emerged last year when Congressman Jeff Miller (R. FLA) , Chairman of the House Veterans Affairs, a staunch advocate of VHA privatization, lambasted the VHA for spending $483,000 for a sculpture in a hospital courtyard. For Miller, whom Donald Trump has promised to appoint to the post of Secretary of Veterans Affairs should he be elected, the issue was not the quality of the art used at VHA facilities but the fact that the VHA was using taxpayer money to spend on art, period. Miller called such spending “wanton and abusive.” 

Read More

 

Bad Day for Veterans at HVAC

perspective0221magNew blog post at the American Prospect

Hill Hearing Spells Bad News for Veterans

Not a single veterans service organizations was asked to speak last week at the House Veterans Affairs Committee’s hearing on the final recommendations of the VA Commission on Care, though such groups represent millions of former military personnel.

Also noticeably absent from the witness list was Vietnam veteran Michael Blecker, executive director of the San Francisco veterans group Swords to Plowshares, who served on the Commission on Care, and who dissented from its final report. Blecker objected that the commission’s leading recommendation—the creation of a so-called VHA Health System network of private sector care providers—could fatally weaken veterans’ health care.  Read More

Veterans Health Is Really Good

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Studies Show Veterans Health Care Improving

When the House Veterans Affairs Committee holds a hearing on September 7 to assess the future of the Veterans Health Administration, federal lawmakers would do well to consider recent reports that challenge the continual drumbeat of negative and often unfair coverage and congressional criticism of the VHA.

One report, from the RAND Corporation, said that while there were differences in care and leadership culture across the system, researchers “did not find evidence of a system-wide crisis in access to VA care.” In fact, the report identified congressional policies as one of the main barriers to VHA improvements (despite the Veteran Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller’s apparent belief that firing VHA leaders is the solution to any access problems). The report noted that “inflexibility in budgeting stem[med] from the congressional appropriation processes,” and concluded that the hastily designed and implemented Veterans Choice Program, “further complicated the situation and resulted in confusion among veterans, VA employees, and non-VA providers.”

Though it received no media attention, another positive report on the VHA came this month from the Joint Commission, the independent nonprofit that accredits U.S. hospitals and health-care organizations. After surveying the VHA between 2014 and 2015, the commission found improvements in access, timeliness, and coordination of care, as well as in leadership, safety, staffing, and competency.  Read More.