Silencing Employees? Is that Good for Patient Safety at the VHA?

From Beyond Chron

New Threats to Patient Safety at the VHA

by Suzanne Gordon on March 9, 2017

VA Hospital in Washington DC

VA Hospital in Washington DC

Ever since a physician at the Phoenix VA Health Care System reported that Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrators had been gaming data on wait times for patient appointments, VA whistleblowers have been embraced on Capitol Hill. There may be disagreement in Washington about the future of the VHA, but there is bi-partisan agreement that VHA employees should be supported and rewarded when they act to protect their patients.

Unfortunately, not enough legislators and veterans advocates understand that acting to create real patient safety involves far more than being a traditional whistleblower, which, as Webster’s dictionary explains, is “one who reveals something covert or who informs against another.” Or as the Federal Whistleblower Protection Act defines it, involves reporting a “violation of a law, rule or regulation; gross mismanagement; gross waste of funds; an abuse of authority; or a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety.” 

As an extensive literature on patient safety documents, patient safety depends not primarily on the acts of heroic whistleblowers, but on the creation of a workplace environment where you don’t have to be a hero to voice concerns or criticisms, share insights, and make suggestions for change on a daily basis. READ MORE

Vets at Risk From Trump Attack on VA Unions and Free Speech

VApicJust posted this on The American Prospect, please read, like, comment and share.

VA Whistleblowers Beware: Tweeting Under Trump is No Two-Way Street`

Fact Checking the Fact Checkers at the Washington Post

imagesJust did this new blog post for the American Prospect.  Please read and share.

Fact-Checking Fact-Checkers on Privatizing Vets’ Health Care

In the debate over the future of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), no concept has attracted more controversy than “privatization.” Since wholesale privatization of the VHA is deeply unpopular among veterans and their advocacy organizations, groups like the Koch brothers-funded Concerned Veterans for America (CVA) argue that they do not support “privatization” of the VHA. As the CVA’s “Fixing Veterans Health Care” report, published earlier this year explains, the group just wants to give veterans “the same degree of choice that is available to other Americans,” with the federal government paying the tab.

Last week, The Washington Post entered the fray. Writing for the paper’s “Fact Checker” column, reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee gave Senator Jon Tester of Montana and Representative Mark Takano of California, both Democrats, three out of a possible four Pinocchios (signifying “significant factual error and/or obvious contradictions”) for suggesting that the CVA and Trump transition team members support VHA privatization. According to Lee, the CVA’s position does not constitute privatization because, the “CVA has not proposed a wholesale transfer of VHA’s services over to the private sector—which is what ‘privatization’ usually describes.”

READ MORE

Will Trump Put VHA Staff at Risk

vhaHere is another important post from Beyond Chron.

When thousands of health care professionals at the Veterans Health Administration  (VHA) greet their patients every day at more than 1200 facilities around the country, the first thing they say is: “thank you for your service.”  Their own dedicated service to 9 million veterans is equally worthy of gratitude–and most of those benefiting from it freely express theirs as well.

Unfortunately, President-elect Trump, who never served in the military, doesn’t feel the same way about the care provided by the VHA’s 300,000 employees or show similar respect to their patients. In his recent campaign, Trump said mentally ill veterans for weren’t strong and “can’t handle it”(not to mention calling former Navy pilot John McCain a “loser” for being shot down in combat, badly injured, captured and then abused as a prisoner of war).

Trump also favors privatization of VHA services across-the-board. Congressional Republicans will now have an Oval office champion for their efforts not only to repeal “Obamacare,” but to begin the process of dismantling the VHA.  READ MORE

Will Trump Deliver for Veterans

perspective0221magBased on this election, here is a new post from the American Prospect

Will Trump Deliver for Veterans?

On the campaign trail, President-elect Donald Trump repeated one key promise: to “Make America Great Again” by increasing the country’s military might and supporting its 24 million military veterans. After all, he promised to raise money for veterans and said he donated a million dollars out of his own pocket to veterans’ charities.

But Trump showed his true colors long before Election Day. He finally wrote a personal check to one veteran’s group but only after four months when reporters shamed him into doing so. Trump dissed mentally ill veterans for being weak. Most famously, he called Senator John McCain, who was a Navy pilot during the Vietnam War, a “loser” after being shot down in combat, badly injured, captured, and then abused as a prisoner of war. Nevertheless, many veterans voted for Trump by a large margin.

That’s no great start for “veterans affairs.” But the mistreatment of vets could go from rhetorical to real. That’s because Trump favors some form of privatization of all Veterans Health Administration services, a long sought-after goal of congressional Republicans.  READ MORE